fbpx Skip to Content

Published Journal Articles

Biodegradable Drug-Delivery Peptide Nanocapsules

ABSTRACT:Branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs) are an efficient transport system that can deliver nucleic acids, small proteins, and solutes. The ability of BAPCs to break down is essential to their adoption as a delivery vehicle for human and agricultural applications. Until now, however, BAPCs were shown to be inert to…

Continue Reading

Synthesis and Characterization of Multifunctional Branched Amphiphilic Peptide Bilayer Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles

ABSTRACT:We provide strong chemical and biophysical evidence that documents that branched amphiphilic peptides, BAPs, known to assemble into spherical nanoassemblies in solution, do assemble as peptide-bilayer-delimited capsules. These nanoassemblies are termed branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs). BAPCs are taken up by cells and accumulate in the perinuclear region to persist…

Continue Reading

Delivery of Lethal dsRNAs in Insect Diets by Branched Amphiphilic Peptide Capsules

ABSTRACT:Development of new and specific insect pest management methods is critical for overcoming pesticide resistance and collateral off-target killings. Gene silencing by feeding dsRNA to insects shows promise in this area. Here we described the use of a peptide nano-material, branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs), that facilitates cellular uptake of…

Continue Reading

Branched Amphipathic Peptide Capsules: Different Ratios of the Two Constituent Peptides Direct Distinct Bilayer Structures, Sizes, and DNA Transfection Efficiency

ABSTRACT:Branched amphipathic peptide capsules (BAPCs) are biologically derived, bilayer delimited, nanovesicles capable of being coated by or encapsulating a wide variety of solutes. The vesicles and their cargos are readily taken up by cells and become localized in the perinuclear region of cells. When BAPCs are mixed with DNA, the…

Continue Reading

Organization and Structure of Branched Amphipathic Oligopeptide Bilayers

ABSTRACT:A class of self-assembling branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs) was recently developed that could serve as a new drug delivery vehicle. BAPCs can encapsulate solutes up to ∼12 kDa during assembly, are unusually stable, and are readily taken up by cells with low cytotoxicity. Coarse-grained simulations have supported that BAPCs…

Continue Reading

Gene Delivery and Immunomodulatory Effects of Plasmid DNA Associated with Branched Amphiphilic Peptide Capsules

ABSTRACT:We recently reported on a new class of branched amphiphilic peptides that associate with double stranded DNA and promote in vitro transfection of eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we tested a different formulation in which plasmid DNA associates with the surface of preformed 20–30 nm cationic capsules formed through…

Continue Reading

A Review of Solute Encapsulating Nanoparticles used as Delivery Systems with Emphasis on Branched Amphipathic Peptide Capsules

ABSTRACT:Various strategies are being developed to improve delivery and increase the biological half-lives of pharmacological agents. To address these issues, drug delivery technologies rely on different nano-sized molecules including: lipid vesicles, viral capsids and nano-particles. Peptides are a constituent of many of these nanomaterials and overcome some limitations associated with…

Continue Reading

Thermally Induced Conformational Transitions in Nascent Branched Amphiphilic Peptide Capsules

ABSTRACT:Branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs) are biocompatible, bilayer delimited polycationic nanospheres that spontaneously form at room temperature through the coassembly of two amphiphilic branched peptides: bis(FLIVI)-K-K4 and bis(FLIVIGSII)-K-K4. BAPCs are readily taken up by cells in culture, where they escape and/or evade the endocytic pathway and accumulate in the perinuclear…

Continue Reading

Branched Amphiphilic Cationic Oligopeptides Form Peptiplexes with DNA: A Study of Their Biophysical Properties and Transfection Efficiency

ABSTRACT:Over the past decade, peptides have emerged as a new family of potential carriers in gene therapy. Peptides are easy to synthesize and quite stable. Additionally, sequences shared by the host proteome are not expected to be immunogenic or trigger inflammatory responses, which are commonly observed with viral approaches. We…

Continue Reading

Synthetic In Vitro Delivery Systems for Plasmid DNA in Eukaryotes

ABSTRACT:Success for gene therapy clinical protocols depends on the design of safe and efficient gene carriers. Nature had already designed efficient DNA or RNA delivery devices, namely virus particles. However, they have a propensity to trigger neutralizing and other immune responses and insertional mutagenesis have limited their clinical use. Alternatively,…

Continue Reading

Branched Amphiphilic Peptide Capsules: Cellular Uptake and Retention of Encapsulated Solutes

ABSTRACT:Branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs) are peptide nano-spheres comprised of equimolar proportions of two branched peptide sequences bis(FLIVI)-K-KKKK and bis(FLIVIGSII)-K-KKKK that self-assemble to form bilayer delimited capsules. In two recent publications we described the lipid analogous characteristics of our BAPCs, examined their initial assembly, mode of fusion, solute encapsulation, and…

Continue Reading

Branched Oligopeptides Form Nanocapsules with Lipid Vesicle Characteristics

ABSTRACT:In a recent article (Gudlur et al. PLOS ONE, 2012, 7 (9) e45374), we described the special properties of a mixed branched peptide assembly in which equimolar bis(FLIVI)-K-KKKK and bis(FLIVIGSII)-K-KKKK self-associate to form bilayer delimited capsules capable of trapping solutes. These polycationic vesicle-like capsules are readily taken up by epithelial…

Continue Reading

Peptide Nanovesicles Formed by the Self-Assembly of Branched Amphiphilic Peptides

ABSTRACT:Peptide-based packaging systems show great potential as safer drug delivery systems. They overcome problems associated with lipid-based or viral delivery systems, vis-a-vis stability, specificity, inflammation, antigenicity, and tune-ability. Here, we describe a set of 15 & 23-residue branched, amphiphilic peptides that mimic phosphoglycerides in molecular architecture. These peptides undergo supramolecular…

Continue Reading

Additional Data